“It’s Hard to Understand If You Haven’t Lived Here”

When I was recently interviewed for a Wall Street Journal article, answering questions about doing business in Texas came remarkably easy. The interview was nominally about Rick Perry, but almost all our time was spent discussing the state’s relatively healthy job scene.

When asked why Texas is special, I told Dan Henninger about a Brooklyn native and friend named John who worked for me in Dallas in the late 80’s. After having lived in half a dozen cities across the country during his career, he deliberately targeted moving to Dallas when he and his wife were ready to start a family. What inspired him was the attitude of businesspeople in Texas when they lived there once before in the early 80’s.

At that time, the energy sector was spiraling downward at a record pace, but he remembered that, instead of bemoaning their situation, the Texans around him were talking about what they were going to do next. In some cases it meant starting over in new areas of the energy sector, while others were planning how to start anew in other markets. No one spent time crying about their dire situation. The optimism he saw in Texas was like nothing he’d seen elsewhere, so he and his wife deliberately returned a few years later.

My friend Ed Trevis (also quoted in the article) provides another perspective from a non-native Texan. As the long-time CEO of a high tech embedded computing business in Silicon Valley, Ed finally became fed up with California’s overbearing tax and regulatory environment, so he surveyed locations in many other states, looking for the best place to relocate. His criteria included a strong, well-educated labor force, less government interference, and an attractive cost of doing business. Texas came out far ahead in his analysis, and the city of Cedar Park outside Austin provided the perfect place to move his business, which has thrived there since the move two-and-a-half years ago.

To be fair, there are great people everywhere, there are thriving businesses in other states, and there are spots that beat out Texas in one way or another. What is unique about Texas, though, is not only its labor force, its supportive governmental policies, and its low cost structure, but the optimism and collaborative attitude so prevalent among its people. As David Booth, who moved Dimensional Fund Advisors’s headquarters to Austin from California, said, “It’s hard to understand if you haven’t lived here.”

 

Technology M&A Is Accelerating

A few days ago, I posted links to interesting articles in an exit strategy update. Indications are that the next 12-18 months  will produce an increase in the acquisition of technology companies, so having an exit strategy in place and aligning with potential acquirers remains top of mind for CEOs. Let’s review some of the evidence.

One significant indicator is that tech companies have started using debt to raise capital. A recent WSJ article said that “the decision to take on debt breaks from tradition in tech, where companies have typically preferred to raise money by selling stock. Debt has become a more attractive fundraising option largely because interest rates are low… Turning to debt is an especially big change for software companies, which typically generate lots of cash and aren’t saddled with large one-time expenses like opening a factory.”

While the focus of the article was on the largest companies like Cisco, Microsoft, H-P, Oracle Corp., International Business Machines Corp., and Dell Inc. who raised more than $20 billion combined in 2009 selling bonds, smaller companies are following suit. Salesforce.com’s $575M debt offering and Adobe’s of $1.5B, both in January, mean that the acquisition drive is broadening.

Yesterday StreetInsider.com quoted an FBR Capital Markets report that “software vendors are flush with cash given the cashflow-rich nature of the software model and more than a handful of vendors have even recently raised additional capital.” The FBR Capital report even suggested some likely acquisitions:

So what should CEOs of smaller technology companies who want to grow shareholder value do? At a minimum, three things:

  1. Understand who your most likely acquirers are and keep the list up-to-date.
  2. Ensure that your company stays focused on activities that increase your attractiveness to those acquirers.
  3. Create partnerships with potential acquirers and other companies who make your company more compelling to those acquirers.

Whether you want to be acquired in the short term or the long term, your company’s value is in the eye of the beholder, and the most important beholders are acquirers.