Celebrating Another Anniversary

CEOs rarely (never?) google to find a consultant with ideas to accelerate their business. To help a CEO with strategy, you first have to get on his/her radar, then bring credibility to the initial conversation. The relationship always begins when a CEO tells a mutual friend about a particular business challenge, then that friend introduces 20/20 Outlook as a reliable and trusted source of breakout strategies.

Earlier this month, 20/20 Outlook LLC celebrated its fourth anniversary. While it’s hard to believe it’s been four years, it’s easy to understand enables success. In a business that relies 100% on referrals to gain new business, having wonderful friends and associates means everything. Thank you!

NOTE: In December I started sending the Accelerated Vision CEO Digest once a month to about 400 CEOs and a few other friends. It shares valuable articles of interest to CEOs in a rapidly consumable format, along with an inspirational saying or two. If you’re a CEO (or a wannabe) who’d like to be included, send a note to bob@2020outlook.com.  

2014 Issues for a 2016 Exit

Joel Trammell requested a guest post for his American CEO blog, and it’s called 2014 Issues for a 2016 Exit. You’ll find many other great thoughts for CEOs there, and since it’s a two-part article, subscribe there and/or here to make sure you get the second half next week.

CEO Flow v. Multitasking

In a recent article in Small Business Trends, CEO Curt Finch of Journyx contrasts the benefits of “flow” over “multitasking” in achieving optimal employee productivity. Recent studies show that multitasking can be highly unproductive, while flow is much better:

“As defined by author and psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, flow occurs when you enter a state of intense and effortless concentration on the task at hand. It is often referred to as ‘being in the zone,’ and employees are far more productive while in this state than at any other time.”

That made me wonder to what extent the same principle applies to CEOs and how they use their time. Most CEOs are paragons of multitasking. Each day comprises formal and informal meetings and calls that address a multitude of topics across multiple domains. A CEO friend once described it this way: “It feels like I’m walking the halls of the office and people are ripping off pieces of flesh as I walk by. At the end of the day, I’m exhausted.”

As with employees, multitasking would seem to be the natural enemy of flow for CEOs. Of course a CEO must necessarily handle more than one issue at a time, but if you continually find yourself without enough time to adequately address important but not urgent issues, multitasking may be slowing your company’s growth.

Finding uninterrupted time to consider how to grow the company is a common CEO challenge. Achieving “CEO flow” may require a level of discipline above what you’ve applied in the past. Delegating more tasks to your executive team, encouraging them to be more mutually accountable, and becoming more protective of open space in your calendar can enable you to become the chief visionary officer that your company needs.

Are you spending time in the zone that’s needed to create the right vision, or are you always multitasking?

Self-Fueling Partnership: Apple and AT&T

“In this new wave of technology, you can’t do it all yourself; you have to form alliances.”                           -Carlos Slim Helu 

Addressing startup entrepreneurs at RISE Week Austin, I asked, “If the richest man on the planet thinks alliances are critical, shouldn’t you?” (As a four-time startup survivor – 1985, 1995, 2000, 2002 – I’m driven to give CEOs the knowledge and passion they need to accelerate growth through partnerships.

The Apple/AT&T partnership was a classic: Apple sought broad distribution while AT&T needed new technology. Together they demonstrated how to create a self-fueling partnership, i.e. one that is structured such that positive results for the first party drives it to act in ways that increase positive results for the second party, and vice versa.

Let’s dissect this well-known business case to identify a few principles of “self-fueling partnerships”:

Principle #1   “Partner when the impact of a threat or opportunity is high, and your ability to respond is weak.” 

Apple had an innovative product that needed to be deployed rapidly in order to grab the top spot in the emerging smartphone market. The opportunity was huge, but the carriers controlled access to the customers. AT&T, on the other hand, wanted to grow its data services revenue, and a killer product would help to capture more subscribers.

Principle #2   “Develop a compelling approach before approaching the other party.” 

Apple based their approach to AT&T on its need to capture new subscribers by raiding other carriers. Since people are reluctant to change carriers, AT&T could afford to heavily subsidize the iPhone in exchange for the long-term annuity they’d build from people who switched to their network.

Principle #3   “Be willing to provide exclusivity if you can limit the time and geography.” 

While Apple wanted to grab the #1 spot with rapid deployment, they knew they’d later have to extend distribution through other carriers after significantly penetrating AT&T’s base.  A good bet is that Apple agreed to extend exclusive access to iPhone for as long as AT&T continued to meet aggressive growth goals, then at a later date, Apple would be free to sell through other carriers.

If you have other interesting partnership examples, let us know!.  

 

What You Think You Know May Blind You To Growth Opportunities

TexasCEO magazine just published my latest thoughts about partnerships. In addition to correcting myths about partnerships in general, it describes major types of self-fueling partnerships and the series of steps you can employ to accelerate the growth of your business.

As always, let’s hear your feedback, either below or the TexasCEO web site.

 

How Infoglide Enhanced Its Acquisition Options

How does a company get acquired? FICO’s acquisition of Infoglide provides an excellent example of applying deliberate steps to increase the odds and accelerate the process.

CEO Mike Shultz graciously allowed us to describe the backstory in a short case study. Read it to discover what you can do to attract potential acquirers. 

 

>> CASE STUDY: How Infoglide Enhanced Its Acquisition Options

 

 

Breakout Strategies in Tough Times

Entering 2013, we have larger challenges than ever.  Economic slowdowns in Europe and projected softening demand in Asia and elsewhere are forcing CEOs to pursue more challenging growth opportunities.  This is not an option: we grow or we die.

For many firms, growth has historically come from new products or innovative extensions to existing products.  The simple growth strategy where R&D generates a new widget, Marketing promotes it, and Sales introduces it to customers isn’t working that well any more.  And even if revenue is growing, profits are often generated at the expense of ever deepening cuts in personnel, core capabilities, and reduced investment in capital and equipment.  CEOs are worried that soon they will have to pay the proverbial piper.

M&A alone won’t do it either.  While firms can and often should acquire or merge to become more competitive, most M&A data shows that the combined enterprise delivers little increased profitability.  At best, results are additive, not multiplicative or geometric.  So what’s next?  Where can we find that elusive growth?

Leading companies are broadening their definition of growth beyond traditional product-based categories to include more novel growth strategies.  For CEOs to take advantage of any of them, they must consider the real impacts on their businesses and determine the capabilities they will need to succeed.

First, creative CEOs need to generate a complete portfolio of growth initiatives that include: geographic expansion and M&A; product-based extensions and positioning; integration or bundling of products and services; marketing-driven initiatives like segmentation and value-pricing; localized delivery through outsourced capabilities; value-driven arrangements like performance guarantees; and IT-based strategies like remote services.

Second, CEOs need to determine how best to apply scarce resources to these initiatives, being especially careful to avoid the trap of over-investing in existing businesses – through both capital and key resource allocation – at the expense of novel and potentially much more profitable strategies.  Communicating the necessity of and how best to implement novel strategies to their boards is a critical challenge.  Key questions include: “Do I have the right leaders in the current businesses?  Can my current team succeed in these new lines of business?  Is the plan aggressive enough?  Have we achieved the right balance of risk and projected return?”

Finally, only careful analysis will determine whether any of these breakout strategies are appropriate for your firm.  Can you get buy-in from all stakeholder groups?  Will employees get excited about the new opportunities?  Will the board support the initiatives?  Can you communicate the new direction effectively to analysts and investors?

In these especially demanding times, CEOs must gain a broader perspective and challenge their internal teams’ assumptions.  Make sure that you incorporate external research and insights into your thinking before making the hard calls.

Lead Through Culture

Last week, I attended Austin Business Journal’s CEO awards event with Ed Trevis, CEO of Corvalent. The city’s vibrant entrepreneurial scene wouldn’t exist without talented and dedicated CEOs, and an invited group had gathered to honor Austin’s best and brightest.

Brett Hurt, CEO of Bazaarvoice, won the award for large company CEOs. His company recently went public and continues to grow at a rapid pace. Fortunately, I met Brett a couple of years ago and was later able to spend some time in his office talking about his passion – managing company culture.

In the book I’m writing called Shoot the Runt, the latest CEO/mentor dialog illustrates one example of how culture affects success. Each dialog is based on real principles from serial CEOs. I’m very grateful to Brett for providing the concept for this chapter and agreeing to help with the book.

I hope you enjoy the dialog called Lead Through Culture, and as always, your input is appreciated.

 

The Molecule Behind Effective Teamwork

If you’re a CEO, you may have days when you’d be ecstatic to learn that instant teamwork would happen by simply asking each employee to take a pill. That day may be imminent, but recent research points to ways you can get more cooperation without prescription meds.

Paul Zak organized and leads the first doctoral program in neuroeconomics at Claremont Graduate University. In 2004, his lab discovered the role that the brain chemical oxytocin plays in enabling us to determine who to trust – the higher the level of the hormone, the greater the degree of trust. He’s worked for years to understand the connection between brain chemistry and decision-making, and how that ultimately affects our economic system.

The research around the hormone oxytocin provides a neurochemical understanding of important management principles that have evolved over the years. For example, keeping employees engaged in the outcome of the project they’re working on yields more success. Dr. Zak suggests that team leaders identify goals, establish how those goals will be reached, and put stress on each individual by explaining his/her role in achieving the group’s success. “Clear outcome measures build trust.”

Even more interesting is the work his lab has done in determining the effect that social media has on oxytocin levels in the brain. The findings show that oxytocin goes up during the use of social media, and furthermore, the precise level correlates with the subject’s perceived closeness to the person he/she is engaged with.

A video interview conducted by Harvard Business Review gives more detail. To oversimplify his conclusions, be nice to those around you. It’ll make you and your employees feel better and you’ll both produce more.

In this video interview, researcher Paul Zak describes recent findings about how oxytocin encourages cooperation in the workplace and how its level is affected by the use of social media.

 

Breakout Strategies

The best time to evaluate the direction of your business is while it is thriving. I’m currently rethinking 20/20 Outlook’s strategic positioning, and it’s focused on creating breakout strategies.

What are breakout strategies?

The work “breakout” implies constraints. Most companies fail early, a precious few like Amazon, Google, and Facebook rise meteorically, and the remainder become “established” businesses. These established companies often hit a plateau in their growth, resulting in flattened revenue and profit. At that point, it’s common to find a CEO frustrated by a period of constrained growth and experiencing the “CEO dilemma.”

Breaking out of a growth plateau implies change. Most CEOs are visionary, so it’s their business vision that defines targeted outcomes for the company. The CEO’s vision may point the company toward an inspiring destination, yet without clear strategies, employees may be clueless about how to get there, or even worse, may waste resources by taking conflicting routes.

Maybe the CEO’s vision is unrealistic given a changing market environment that he/she fails to recognize. Maybe good strategies are hampered by bad or non-existent external communication. Maybe the company hasn’t learned to properly leverage relationships with other companies in order to expand their offerings, open new markets, or gain access to a broader prospect base.

In every instance, breakout thinking is needed to create breakout strategies that:

  • provide a deep understanding of the market situation,
  • develop a clear picture of the competitive landscape, and
  • provide credible data on which to base plans
  • give a clear rationale for action from which detailed department plans will flow,
  • lead the company to an optimal return on investment of its finite resources
  • last but not least, create energy and enthusiasm.

Truly visionary CEOs sense when an outside catalyst can challenge the status quo and illuminate new possibilities, then they act decisively to introduce change that leads to breakout strategies.

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