Messaging – the Holy Grail of Marketing

[Guest post contributed by Cathy Martin]

Have you ever read a company’s website or marketing collateral, or had a conversation with one of its execs, and come away from the encounter with absolutely no idea what the company does – or why you should care? Me too, all the time.

Obviously, the company in question has major issues with messaging. 

What troubles me most when I encounter ineffective messaging is that it’s usually an indication that the company lacks a solid positioning foundation. A well-defined positioning strategy is mission-critical for any business. For entrepreneurial companies, it’s pretty much a make or break deal.

Let’s talk about positioning for a moment. 

Positioning can be defined in many different ways. I often explain it to clients like this…

Okay, imagine the ideal impact you could have on your ideal target customer. Now, imagine marketing that conveys this impact in a way that creates the ideal perception in the mind of that target customer. The process of defining this perception, the “mental position” you want to occupy (in the mind of the customer), is the fine art of positioning.

Al Ries and Jack Trout said it best in the classic, The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing: “Marketing is not a battle of products, it’s a battle of perceptions.”

Positioning is key because it shifts your focus from the internal issues of building your company/product, and aims it squarely on your real “reason for being” – the unique customer value that you offer (your secret sauce and greatest competitive advantage) Once your positioning approach is defined, then it’s a matter of crystallizing this positioning into clear, concise, consistent messaging that inspires and engages the target customer.

How’s your messaging working? 

Here’s a litmus test, in case you’re wondering… the most common messaging mistakes I see:

Kitchen sink messaging: When your messaging tries too hard to cover all the bases (be everything to everyone), the end result is that it speaks to no one. If your target customers can’t identify, quickly and easily, how your product offering relates to them, they’re off to the next contender (over and out).

Head scratch messaging: If your messaging is overly complex, vague or confusing – if it contains acronyms, “tech speak” or language that doesn’t readily resonate with the target customer – then you’ve lost a precious opportunity to create a connection with them. They quickly throw in the towel and move on.

Kool-Aid messaging: It’s all too easy to get caught up in your own world, aka “drink the Kool-Aid”, where the center of the universe is the product you’re delivering. After all, those bells and whistles are very cool, right? Unfortunately, folks aren’t going to care about all that, unless your marketing makes them care – by clearly conveying the unique value that you offer and precisely what it means to them.

Yeah, right messaging: Sure, your messaging should absolutely put your best foot forward in a way that’s bold and compelling. However, if it makes claims that seem too grandiose or unbelievable, then target customers are left to wonder about the reality of what you’re offering and the truth of your promises. Obviously, that’s deadly.

Me too messaging: I know, sometimes your competitors say things that you believe are “more true” about your company or product than theirs. But, if your messaging mimics theirs, or generally sounds like everyone else, your target customers are going to see you as just another sheep in the herd (or is that the flock?).

Messaging du jour: Here it is, the  #1 Hall of Fame messaging pitfall… messaging that changes as fast, or as often, as central Texas weather. When your messaging is constantly shifting – without a validated reason or managed approach – nothing sticks, nobody gets it, you stake no clear ground in the marketplace. Game over, time to pack up your toys and go home.

Any way you slice it, creating messaging that captures and conveys your unique customer value, with precision and impact, can be a challenging endeavor. If you suspect that your messaging isn’t working quite right, don’t take it lightly. Find a way to remedy that situation – and fast.

This post was provided by Cathy Martin, owner of Cathy Martin Consults, an entrepreneurial marketing consulting firm based in Austin, Texas. Over the last two decades, Cathy has worked with dozens of companies – all shapes, sizes, stages and flavors – to define positioning strategies, messaging platforms, practical marketing plans and programs. For more entrepreneurial marketing insights, see: www.cathymartin.com.