Is Your Company Geared Up for Growth?

“Gear up” means “to prepare for something that you have to do” or “to prepare someone else for something” (source: Cambridge Dictionary). To assess whether your company is prepared to grow, ask whether your management team has clear answers to 4 questions:

1. Does the company offer something special enough to compel customers to spend money?

The instinctive answer is “of course it does.” After all, a customer base exists and the company is stable, even if growth is slow. But can the management team relate a shared, crystal clear vision of the company, its category, and its primary benefit? The kinds of companies it sells to? The roles of people within those companies that are involved in purchasing? Other unique qualities that differentiate you from competitors? Answers to these questions comprise a company’s strategic positioning, and a lack of team alignment on it leads to huge inefficiencies.

2. How does the company fit into the bigger picture of the market served?

Understanding which companies are competitors and which are potential allies is essential for sales success. Companies often assume competition exists when there may be a chance to partner effectively instead. Understanding the needs of other key companies leads to a clearer understanding of current opportunities, where value exists in your market space, and the potential to leverage the success of potential partners to provide better customer solutions.

3. What relationships with other companies can accelerate growth?

Most CEOs are skeptical about partnering with another company because it’s perceived as too difficult to be successful. While most partnerships fail because of poor analysis, poor planning, and poor management, a well-planned partnership can enable a company to leapfrog its competitors.

4. How can the company operate more effectively to bring the CEO’s vision to reality?

Having the right growth strategy is important, but execution ultimately determines success. Once a company reaches a certain size, growth can be limited by having outmoded or inappropriate processes in place. “We’ve always done it this way” is not an acceptable answer. Outside help may be required to drive the strategy into successful execution.

The chart below illustrates three levels of “gearing up” that a company can find itself in: stalled, moving, and accelerating.




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning how to accelerate your vision and take your company from “stalled” to “accelerating” will be the topic of a subsequent post.

20/20 Outlook’s Third Anniversary

It’s been three years since the launch of 20/20 Outlook as an advisory service for CEOs, and I’ve been blessed with wonderfully rewarding and interesting experiences along the way. By acting as a sounding board for creative business leaders and helping them get clarity about their purpose, value, and relationships, each one has accelerated the quest to achieve his/her business vision.

Recently, Brad Young came into the 20/20 fold as another trusted CEO advisor, bringing with him a whole new set of gifts and talents. His major focus is on initiatives that complete strategies with flawless execution.

Our client discussions cover every aspect of each business, and we often discuss areas of personal challenge and growth. Similar to traditional executive coaching, building trusted CEO relationships has enabled discussions of their strengths and weaknesses, passions, and even the personal search for meaning and purpose. A side benefit that clients have cited is more effective communication with board members, leading to more productive relationships.

Along the way, a wonderful network of people has evolved around us. Each one has generously supported 20/20’s steady growth with introductions and recommendations, suggestions for new offerings, adoption of 20/20 processes, and partnering to help clients. Because of this network, LinkedIn recently recognized my profile as among the top 1%  frequently viewed profiles in 2012.

To our friends and colleagues, thank you for your continuing support!

 

 

Breakout Strategies in Tough Times

Entering 2013, we have larger challenges than ever.  Economic slowdowns in Europe and projected softening demand in Asia and elsewhere are forcing CEOs to pursue more challenging growth opportunities.  This is not an option: we grow or we die.

For many firms, growth has historically come from new products or innovative extensions to existing products.  The simple growth strategy where R&D generates a new widget, Marketing promotes it, and Sales introduces it to customers isn’t working that well any more.  And even if revenue is growing, profits are often generated at the expense of ever deepening cuts in personnel, core capabilities, and reduced investment in capital and equipment.  CEOs are worried that soon they will have to pay the proverbial piper.

M&A alone won’t do it either.  While firms can and often should acquire or merge to become more competitive, most M&A data shows that the combined enterprise delivers little increased profitability.  At best, results are additive, not multiplicative or geometric.  So what’s next?  Where can we find that elusive growth?

Leading companies are broadening their definition of growth beyond traditional product-based categories to include more novel growth strategies.  For CEOs to take advantage of any of them, they must consider the real impacts on their businesses and determine the capabilities they will need to succeed.

First, creative CEOs need to generate a complete portfolio of growth initiatives that include: geographic expansion and M&A; product-based extensions and positioning; integration or bundling of products and services; marketing-driven initiatives like segmentation and value-pricing; localized delivery through outsourced capabilities; value-driven arrangements like performance guarantees; and IT-based strategies like remote services.

Second, CEOs need to determine how best to apply scarce resources to these initiatives, being especially careful to avoid the trap of over-investing in existing businesses – through both capital and key resource allocation – at the expense of novel and potentially much more profitable strategies.  Communicating the necessity of and how best to implement novel strategies to their boards is a critical challenge.  Key questions include: “Do I have the right leaders in the current businesses?  Can my current team succeed in these new lines of business?  Is the plan aggressive enough?  Have we achieved the right balance of risk and projected return?”

Finally, only careful analysis will determine whether any of these breakout strategies are appropriate for your firm.  Can you get buy-in from all stakeholder groups?  Will employees get excited about the new opportunities?  Will the board support the initiatives?  Can you communicate the new direction effectively to analysts and investors?

In these especially demanding times, CEOs must gain a broader perspective and challenge their internal teams’ assumptions.  Make sure that you incorporate external research and insights into your thinking before making the hard calls.

Mutual Accountability Magic

While the latest formula or insight sells business books, most business leaders tend to find their own way, then apply and reapply principles that emerge through their experience.

James Weaver is a serial CEO who’s led multiple companies out of deep holes back to relevance and profitability. He’s one of those gifted CEO’s who quickly finds the right course of action for a failing company and leads the organization to a new and better way to operate.

When I invited him to participate in a book of CEO principles I’m assembling called Shoot the Runt, he suggested a topic immediately. In turning around companies like Gold’s Gym, James developed a mindset and process that encourages everyone in the organization to achieve their highest potential, and he was generous in sharing that process to help the book.

James found repeated success by generating a sense of accountability that drives organizations to new heights of success. Check out the latest CEO/mentor dialog called Mutual Accountability Magic that’s based on the process he’s used successfully multiple times.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Crossing the Second Chasm

Two momentous tipping points threaten most businesses during their lifetime. The first is an external threat that challenges startups, and the second is an internal threat that challenges established, growing businesses. Failing to address either one adequately can result in disaster.

In 1991, Geoff Moore introduced a powerful concept in Crossing the Chasm that became a key concept in the universal business vocabulary. He observed a startup company must leap from (a) an early market dominated by early adopters who seek new solutions to (b) the mainstream market where buyers are more conservative but sustainable financial returns are available. To survive, an emerging company must cross this chasm to secure a beachhead in the mainstream market.

The second chasm is described in Doug Tatum’s 2007 book called No Man’s Land. While less publicized and not as universally understood, this second chasm is no less real and just as inevitable. It’s encountered during “the adolescent stage in which an established but rapidly growing firm is too big to be small, but too small to be big.”

Crossing the second chasm does not call for securing a second beachhead. Instead, the challenge is personal: the CEO must modify the way the business operates without losing the uniqueness that created its initial successes. Tatum identified four “M word” dangers confronting the CEO of a company negotiating this second chasm: misalignment, management, model, and money.

Misalignment of the company with its market requires clarifying the purpose and uniqueness of the company, then focusing all its resources on activities that leverage its best strengths. To paraphrase Tatum, avoiding the hard work of clarifying and systematizing the core business has killed many companies after they make it well past the startup phase. Understanding the strategic positioning of the company (e.g., primary audience and target customers, primary benefits delivered, competitors, and unique differentiators), then aligning everyone in the company with this shared vision is vital to survival.

Outgrowing its management team is the second danger of an established company attempting to grow. Small companies are highly dependent upon the talents of the founder and CEO, but a growing company inevitably exceeds the bandwidth of its CEO and early management. Getting to the next level requires that the CEO relinquish his/her tight control over every aspect of the business in favor of bringing in established managers in key areas. The CEO’s challenge is to retain direct responsibility for key areas, where he/she is most talented, while delegating the other areas to managers who have already developed critical systems and processes before at larger companies.

Outgrowing the model is the third challenge faced by companies crossing the second chasm. The financial model of most young companies depends upon high performance of cheap labor. The CEO works for little or nothing while dedicated employees work crazy hours too for lower-than-industry-standard pay, but this doesn’t scale. As the company outgrows its management, a new financial model accommodating competitive pay, more intense competition, and maintenance of profitability must be quickly developed.

The fourth challenge is money. Entrepreneurs are often surprised that, when the growth they crave starts to happen, cash becomes more scarce rather than more abundant. They are even more surprised by the difficulty they find in getting the financial backing needed to finance more growth. What looks like good news to the CEO looks like significant risk to investors. “The key to raising money is reducing the real and perceived risk of the company” and the key to reducing risk includes taking the previously described three steps.

If you’re a CEO of a growing company and you missed No Man’s Land when it came out, reading it will provide a clearer picture of your business and the challenges you face in growing it.

 

Three Steps Will Recharge Your Business

Washington Post, July 2, 2012: “Outlook for U.S. economy dims as manufacturing shrinks for the first time in nearly 3 years… ‘Our forecast that the U.S. will grow by around 2 percent this year is now looking a bit optimistic,’  said Paul Dales, an economist at Capital Economics.”

Being the CEO requires committing to a “no excuses” life. Others may offer plausible reasons for non-performance, but if your company plateaus, CEO excuses aren’t an option – you must take action:

  • Softening economy? Find a way to take advantage of a changing business landscape.
  • Lengthening sales cycles? Determine how to identify highly motivated prospects.
  • Shrinking margins? Examine whether your company is leveraging its strengths.

Changing your business to address these and similar challenges incurs risk, but the risk of doing nothing is greater. How can you adopt an effective breakout strategy that will recharge you and your executive team?

Here’s a rational, three-step process guaranteed to provide direction: (1) reexamine your company’s true value and what sets it apart; (2) in light of market conditions and competition, determine an altered direction that will maximize value; and (3) identify new business relationships that will open doors to new business. In other words, you need to clarify, comprehend, and connect:

Clarify – Who are you as a company and what sets you apart? What truly separates companies like Apple, Southwest, Berkshire Hathaway, and the NE Patriots from the rest, year after year, is a sense of purpose. Clarifying the organization’s purpose and unique assets beyond a simple mission statement actually increases efficiency. It’s imperative to get this right.

Highly successful companies perform at a high level because they focus on a clearly identifiable market with a differentiated solution. Even successful companies eventually let pressure to increase revenue force acceptance of business outside their primary focus. Since profitability grows by exploiting core competencies, losing focus erodes margins. Having a crystal-clear shared vision of who your company targets and what customer problems it uniquely addresses enables employees to make decisions more rapidly (fewer meetings and emails needed) so more gets accomplished faster and margins increase.

Comprehend – Once you understand your company better, update your understanding of your immediate market. What change in direction will maximize value? Finding the right direction in a complex and competitive market accelerates growth. How do you define who’s in it and who isn’t? What is your relationship to other companies in your space?

One proven method is to pretend you’re selling your company and identify a number of companies that could acquire you and another set that you might acquire or partner with.  By comprehending the needs of potential acquirers, acquisition targets, and partners, you will develop a value framework that identifies high value opportunities.

Connect – Which relationships will increase business the most? Whether your company is B2B or B2C, strong relationships with other companies can help it grow faster. That said, many CEOs have been burned by partnerships that failed due to poor planning, unrealistic expectations, and unmonitored execution.

The solution? Design self-fueling partnerships that continually reinforce each partner’s objectives. Partnering with potential acquirers and industry leaders will drive new revenue by providing access to new markets, extended geographies, enhanced product and service offerings, better branding, and staff augmentation.

By following this three-step process, breaking out of flat growth may be easier than you think.

Breakout Strategies

The best time to evaluate the direction of your business is while it is thriving. I’m currently rethinking 20/20 Outlook’s strategic positioning, and it’s focused on creating breakout strategies.

What are breakout strategies?

The work “breakout” implies constraints. Most companies fail early, a precious few like Amazon, Google, and Facebook rise meteorically, and the remainder become “established” businesses. These established companies often hit a plateau in their growth, resulting in flattened revenue and profit. At that point, it’s common to find a CEO frustrated by a period of constrained growth and experiencing the “CEO dilemma.”

Breaking out of a growth plateau implies change. Most CEOs are visionary, so it’s their business vision that defines targeted outcomes for the company. The CEO’s vision may point the company toward an inspiring destination, yet without clear strategies, employees may be clueless about how to get there, or even worse, may waste resources by taking conflicting routes.

Maybe the CEO’s vision is unrealistic given a changing market environment that he/she fails to recognize. Maybe good strategies are hampered by bad or non-existent external communication. Maybe the company hasn’t learned to properly leverage relationships with other companies in order to expand their offerings, open new markets, or gain access to a broader prospect base.

In every instance, breakout thinking is needed to create breakout strategies that:

  • provide a deep understanding of the market situation,
  • develop a clear picture of the competitive landscape, and
  • provide credible data on which to base plans
  • give a clear rationale for action from which detailed department plans will flow,
  • lead the company to an optimal return on investment of its finite resources
  • last but not least, create energy and enthusiasm.

Truly visionary CEOs sense when an outside catalyst can challenge the status quo and illuminate new possibilities, then they act decisively to introduce change that leads to breakout strategies.

Thanks for Two

Today is the second anniversary of 20/20 Outlook LLC. Helping visionary CEOs create breakout strategies is enjoyable beyond all expectation. Before the launch in February 2010, experienced consulting friends advised that it would take a year for people to remember what 20/20 Outlook is, then another year for the business to hit full stride. They were spot on.

Nine months into it in December, 2010, opportunities started arriving on their own. I remember getting a call from a California friend asking for help in opening up U.S. operations for a European company, then days later came a request to write an article for TexasCEO magazine. The juxtaposition of two unanticipated invitations was encouraging.

My goal remains to provide cycles to busy CEOs immersed in urgent issues so they can accomplish their important but non-urgent ones. While the original 20/20 Outlook process remains an essential weapon, the scope has evolved into the role of trusted advisor to CEOs, bringing clarity and direction to the dreams those CEOs have for their enterprises.

This post is written to thank the numerous friends who have given continual guidance over the past two years, including CEO clients and other long-time friends across multiple disciplines. You make it fun to learn new ways to think about and address the challenges CEO face. From an A- guy blessed with a multitude of A+ friends, thank you!

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