Content is King: 3 Steps to Enhance Your Narrative

The recent release of CocaCola’s new corporate site pivots from pushing products to delivering quality content. At first glance, it looked like a cross between CNN and a gaming site.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In “The corporate Web site is dead, long live the new corporate Web site,” Buzz Builders’ Michelle Mehl uses Coke’s site to assess the impact of richer web content on corporate messaging. “[The] Web site template of — ‘About Us, In the News, Services, Products, Contact Us, FAQ, a Search Box, Blog, Shopping Cart’ — will no longer work… we all have to start thinking more like publishers, reporters, bloggers, reviewers and authors.”

An all-time favorite book title is Seth Godin’s All Marketers are Liars. Seth’s bottom line? Companies need to create a clear, consistent narrative that others relate to. What CocaCola is trying to do with the new site is to aggregate and present engaging content that forms a narrative reinforcing the image they want to project.

Our immediate impulse to redo our business web site to emulate Coke’s cool presence “cools” once we realize the level of effort it takes, not just to create such a site, but to maintain it. Those responsible for most sites, even corporate ones, can’t afford to invest like Coke does to feed their big engine. However, what emerges is an imperative for smaller enterprises (i.e., almost all of us) to enrich our web site narrative.

To enrich your narrative, consider taking 3 steps that won’t require an increase in marketing staff:

  1.  Add engaging content. “Engaging” means video since that’s the most engaging format available. Instead of writing a 500 word article, make a 3 minute video that is certain to engage many more people.
  2. Change the content regularly. That can be as simple as adding a blog (or vlog) and updating it regularly, whether that’s monthly, weekly, or daily.
  3. Experiment with content. Employ some “disciplined dreaming” to deliberately step outside the usual topics and expand your audience.
Now that you’ve read this far, here’s the same information in a 3 minute video. Even though I’m not experienced with video, it likely has more impact than the written post. You decide.
_______________________________________________________________________

The Evolution of Internet Access

Long-time friend Paul Gillin is an acknowledged expert on social media who has written several books on the subject. I highly recommend subscribing to his excellent blog and newsletter where he continually shares what he’s found through helping firms work out their social media strategies.

In my own busy end of the year, I overlooked a piece in one of his December newsletters until this morning. In it he summarized five important insights picked up at the Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco:

  1. Make marketing a service to customers
  2. You need a mobile strategy, and faster than you probably thought
  3. Social is the killer app (surprised, right?)
  4. Simulations are a powerful incentive to engage
  5. Everything on the Web

Supporting point #2 he included these projections regarding the transition we’re making toward mobile devices supplanting notebooks as our primary platform:

What implications does this have for your business? Will mobile devices totally supplant notebooks? Not likely, any more than notebooks have made desktop PCs disappear. What we’re seeing is a proliferation of devices in multiple form factors, all driven by data accessible via internet, with the user interface being packaged applications in more cases and browsers in fewer instances:

“Google’s Eric Schmidt made an interesting point: smart phones are actually more useful than PCs because they know more about the user, including location, and can deliver a more personal level of utility. This doesn’t mean PCs are going away. Rather, the plunging price of flat-panel displays will make PCs more of a dashboard for a user’s business and entertainment needs. However, the browser will be only one of several ways people will access the Internet.”

For more information, check out “Five Lessons from the Web 2.0 Summit“!