Ray Kurzweil on The Age of Embedded Computing Everywhere

Inventor, entrepreneur,  and futurist Ray Kurzweil recently gave an interesting keynote at JavaOne in San Francisco. If you’re interested in how we got here and whether we’ll technology will continue to advance exponentially, he offers great cause for optimism.

The Age of Embedded Computing Everywhere from KAIN Admin on Vimeo.

Surprise: Clients Tell It Best

It’s been awhile since the last post was published. Client deliverables, non-profit activities, and family priorities, as well as continual business development, have made it a hectic time.

The 20/20 elevator pitch is that “it is a process that helps a company get ready and stay ready for an exit,” but it’s more than that. While helping shoot some videos during that non-profit work, we were close to Infoglide’s offices, so I asked CEO Mike Shultz to stand in front of the camera and share his thoughts on his use of the 20/20 process.

Mike has started and sold several companies, which enables him to speak with authority in this 2:47 of unedited footage. With just one take, Mike captures the essence of the process better than any marketing firm I could have hired. Enjoy.

A Milestone for 20/20 Outlook

Exactly six months ago, 20/20 Outlook LLC officially opened for business. If it seems longer than six months, you’re right – planning started over 18 months ago. I felt “nudged” in a new direction and began exploring how to deliver value to CEOs of private companies. The answer ultimately lay in combining an unusual (some might say “weird”) combination of C-level experience in partnerships, acquisitions, and product strategy for startups through billion dollar companies to create the 20/20 Outlook process.

In February, I set a goal to achieve a certain level of business in six months, and we’re on track to surpass that goal this month. Experienced friends in the consulting business say it takes a year to get it off the ground, so it’s exciting to reach this milestone in the middle of what no one but Washington would call a booming economy.

Most new businesses move in different directions once launched, and this one is no exception. Connecting with great clients was planned, and working with some great CEOs to help them achieve their goals is exciting. What was unanticipated is how many people have said “you should write a book” (more on that soon).

No one could be surrounded with a more supportive group of industry friends, comprising serial CEOs, C-level execs, VPs, VCs, private investors, consultants, and other computing industry leaders. Thanks to each of you for being so open and helpful with your advice and encouragement.

Finally, a special note of thanks goes to Mike Shultz, Infoglide Software CEO. His willingness to be a sounding board and continual idea source for 20/20 Outlook is deeply appreciated.

When Should You Partner?

Given that we’ve answered the “why partner” question, now let’s think about the “when to partner” question. Marketplace issues, whether threats or opportunities, commonly drive partnership decisions. For each issue, consider three factors that determine your desire and ability to grow through partnering:

  • Timing: What is the timing associated with this threat or opportunity? Is it immediate or long-term?
  • Potential Impact: What is the potential impact of some threat or opportunity that is currently presenting itself? Is it high or low?
  • Ability to Respond: What is my current ability to respond? Is it strong or weak?

As far as the Timing factor goes, if an issue, i.e. a threat or an opportunity, is not immediate, set it aside. Maybe someday you’ll find time to worry about that one!

For each immediate issue, determine whether it can have a relatively high or low impact and how strong is your ability to respond. Here’s a diagram depicting these points, followed by a brief description of each one:

Partnerships When

High threat/opportunity, strong ability to respond (“Pursue Aggressively”)
This issue is too pressing to postpone, and your company has the resources needed to address it aggressively through product enhancement and new product creation.

Low threat/opportunity, strong ability to respond (“Quick Hits”)
When you spot a weakness in a competitor’s ability to respond to such an issue, attack by leveraging your strength in this area.

Low threat/opportunity, weak ability to respond (“Prepare to Respond”)
These are usually “who cares” issues now that may grow into high impact issues later, so keep an eye on them while doing little to address them.

High threat/opportunity, high ability to respond (“Create Partnerships”)
If you can’t adequately respond to a pressing threat or opportunity, a partnership is the right answer. A partnership can be a precursor to an acquisition.

If I’m right and I’ve communicated clearly, you have a better understanding of why and when to form a business relationship. These are practical business concepts that will ensure your efforts are directed at the best opportunities to achieve the desired outcome for your business – a business that knows where it’s going!

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