CEO Flow v. Multitasking

In a recent article in Small Business Trends, CEO Curt Finch of Journyx contrasts the benefits of “flow” over “multitasking” in achieving optimal employee productivity. Recent studies show that multitasking can be highly unproductive, while flow is much better:

“As defined by author and psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, flow occurs when you enter a state of intense and effortless concentration on the task at hand. It is often referred to as ‘being in the zone,’ and employees are far more productive while in this state than at any other time.”

That made me wonder to what extent the same principle applies to CEOs and how they use their time. Most CEOs are paragons of multitasking. Each day comprises formal and informal meetings and calls that address a multitude of topics across multiple domains. A CEO friend once described it this way: “It feels like I’m walking the halls of the office and people are ripping off pieces of flesh as I walk by. At the end of the day, I’m exhausted.”

As with employees, multitasking would seem to be the natural enemy of flow for CEOs. Of course a CEO must necessarily handle more than one issue at a time, but if you continually find yourself without enough time to adequately address important but not urgent issues, multitasking may be slowing your company’s growth.

Finding uninterrupted time to consider how to grow the company is a common CEO challenge. Achieving “CEO flow” may require a level of discipline above what you’ve applied in the past. Delegating more tasks to your executive team, encouraging them to be more mutually accountable, and becoming more protective of open space in your calendar can enable you to become the chief visionary officer that your company needs.

Are you spending time in the zone that’s needed to create the right vision, or are you always multitasking?

About Bob Barker
Bob Barker is a trusted advisor to CEOs, helping them identify, define, and execute new growth-accelerating opportunities. He also shares ideas on LinkedIn (robertgbarker), in guest posts on related blogs, and in industry publications. Contact him via email at bob@2020outlook.com.

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