The Molecule Behind Effective Teamwork

If you’re a CEO, you may have days when you’d be ecstatic to learn that instant teamwork would happen by simply asking each employee to take a pill. That day may be imminent, but recent research points to ways you can get more cooperation without prescription meds.

Paul Zak¬†organized and leads the first doctoral program in neuroeconomics at Claremont Graduate University. In 2004, his lab discovered the role that the brain chemical oxytocin plays in enabling us to determine who to trust – the higher the level of the hormone, the greater the degree of trust. He’s worked for years to understand the connection between brain chemistry and decision-making, and how that ultimately affects our economic system.

The research around the hormone¬†oxytocin¬†provides a neurochemical understanding of important management principles that have evolved over the years. For example, keeping employees engaged in the outcome of the project they’re working on yields more success. Dr. Zak suggests that team leaders identify goals, establish how those goals will be reached, and put stress on each individual by explaining his/her role in achieving the group’s success. “Clear outcome measures build trust.”

Even more interesting is the work his lab has done in determining the effect that social media has on oxytocin levels in the brain. The findings show that oxytocin goes up during the use of social media, and furthermore, the precise level correlates with the subject’s perceived closeness to the person he/she is engaged with.

A video interview conducted by Harvard Business Review gives more detail. To oversimplify his conclusions, be nice to those around you. It’ll make you and your employees feel better and you’ll both produce more.

In this video interview, researcher Paul Zak describes recent findings about how oxytocin encourages cooperation in the workplace and how its level is affected by the use of social media.

 

About Bob Barker
Bob Barker is a trusted advisor to CEOs, helping them identify, define, and execute new growth-accelerating opportunities. He also shares ideas on LinkedIn (robertgbarker), in guest posts on related blogs, and in industry publications. Contact him via email at bob@2020outlook.com.

Comments

2 Responses to “The Molecule Behind Effective Teamwork”
  1. Teri Hill says:

    Thanks Bob! Once again you point out the fun and fabulous connections to what makes a company, a team great! I appreciate you and will share this with all the leadership teams I facilitate this month. Thank you for being a thought leader and stimulator!

  2. Bob Barker says:

    Teri, I was blown away by your presentation this week and am so glad I got to see you in action. I’m a novice at this compared to all the great work you’ve done with your clients. Thanks for your kind words.

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