What Is It About Texas?

A few nights ago, I attended an event honoring the subject of TexasCEO magazine’s current cover story, Clayton Christopher. I met some other amazing people there and have been thinking since about the experience since then.

(Full disclosure: I have an article the print edition that will also be posted on the TexasCEO web site soon.)

The manner in which our country was born resulted in a population that loves being free to follow their dreams, and for 200+ years, millions of other dreamers have immigrated here. Over a 30-year career in high tech, I traveled the United States meeting wonderful people everywhere I went. Living recently in the Detroit area for several years is a prime example where, despite its exaggeratedly negative reputation, I found incredibly intelligent and highly motivated people building new companies and pursuing their careers with great passion.

If you’re a native Texan or an adoptee of this state, though, you can’t escape what a distinctive place it is. You’re deeply aware of the unique loyalty of its residents and the power of its brand. The shape of the state and its flag are recognizable by people living all over the globe. Many people who grew up in and live in other states have affection for those places, yet nowhere else do you find people who so deeply identify with the state they live in. Why is this true?

When I lived in Dallas during the 90’s, I made a good friend who’d grown up in New York City. By fifteen years into his career, he and his wife had lived in six cities in vastly different regions of the country. When I asked how they came to reside in Dallas, he said they had made a very deliberate decision to move there.

The couple had lived in Texas once before. It was during the 1980’s immediately after a huge downturn in the state’s then-dominant energy industry. The memory of how Texans responded to the economic crisis had stuck with them ever since. Instead of the complaints and despair they might have expected, the universal attitude was optimism. The general attitude was “OK, what can we do now?” and people started planning a new business or a new career. When they started their family, they made a conscious decision to move back to Dallas because they wanted to rear their children among people with a can-do, optimistic outlook on life.

Another anecdote: a CEO friend relocated his company to Austin from Silicon Valley in early 2009 to take advantage of  the large pool of available technical talent and the friendly business climate. While those reasons prompted him to move, what also keeps him here is the love of the state’s optimistic attitude which he mentions often.

Targeted at the state’s business leaders, TexasCEO magazine published its first issue in May 2010. Its articles continually reflect that Texas optimism. The current January/February edition focuses on bootstrapping a business. It’s full of stories about people in different industries and different parts of the state who have successfully created new companies.

So what it is it about Texas? What I’ve encountered upon returning after living out of state several years are people who recognize obstacles yet choose to believe they can overcome them with creativity and hard work. Having grown up around people like that is something I truly appreciate.

So for Texas friends, am I way off base? What is it that you like the most about the state?

For non-Texas friends, does this resonate with you, or are all of us Texans just weird?

About Bob Barker
Bob Barker is a trusted advisor to CEOs, helping them identify, define, and execute new growth-accelerating opportunities. He also shares ideas on LinkedIn (robertgbarker), in guest posts on related blogs, and in industry publications. Contact him via email at bob@2020outlook.com.

Comments

One Response to “What Is It About Texas?”
  1. First of all, there’s a reason that the state slogan is “Texas: It’s like a whole other country.” This is certainly true. Everything is bigger, further apart, and dustier. Texans firmly believe that everything about Texas is better, whether it is or not. Sometimes it is, like Lyle Lovett’s “That’s Right, You’re Not from Texas.” It’s the perfect Texas swing dance anthem. Sometimes, it’s not – see Enron and many other examples of “over-extension.” Mostly, I think Texans forget that they are actually part of the United States and that other places in the US actually have a point of view that could be different. Those others MIGHT NOT be wrong.

    Regarding the business climate, it’s good in Texas, but, particularly for early stage companies, the hype doesn’t match the dollars. Most of the Texas high tech success stories were funded from out of state. That’s another good reason for Texans to be glad to be part of the Good Ol’ US of A.