So Why Partner at All?

Developing a partnership strategy is a critical concern for any company. Key to its formulation is an understanding of why partnerships make sense and under what circumstances they should be pursued. Understanding the context for developing a partnership strategy clarifies the decisions that need to be made.

So why partner at all?

“Whether it sells computers, clothing, or cars, your firm’s fate is increasingly linked to that of many other firms, all of which must collaborate effectively in order for each to thrive…                                          more than ever before, success depends on managing assets your company doesn’t own.”            (from The Keystone Advantage by Marco Iansiti and Roy Levien)

While this is universally true, it’s especially the case in immature and fragmented markets where no one company can possibly own all the pieces of a solution. Customers face a bewildering array of possibilities and choices. Gaining their attention and commitment is not as simple as relating your value proposition. You’re not just selling against direct competitors – you’re usually competing for a piece of a finite budget, and the customer can choose to invest in another area while declining to buy anything from you or your competitors.

By understanding the broader space in which you compete and by knowing how your company fits within that broad context, you’re more likely to successfully educate your customer and help them move to a buying decision. If you’ve analyzed the total market and have partnered and/or acquired to achieve a more complete set of offerings, you’ll be in a position to meet almost any customer’s needs.

So what are the most common reasons to partner? Here are some that come to mind, in no particular order:

  • Increase: ability to deliver, credibility, revenue, market presence
  • Leverage market clout and intellectual assets of market-leading companies
  • Become certified on a process or technology
  • License a product or technology
  • Remove a competitor
  • Negotiate strategic alliances
  • Prepare to execute acquisitions

While these are fairly specific, here’s a matrix that boils the reasons down to the most common ones:

Partnerships Why

In evaluating potential partners, determine early on which drivers are important to your company, the partner, or both. Then begin compiling a list of specific factors that may be important to the target partner. These may become critically important in later negotiations (we’ll talk about “elegant negotiables” another time).

Next we’ll address the issue of when to partner, i.e. under what circumstances does it make sense).

About Bob Barker
Bob Barker is a trusted advisor to CEOs, helping them identify, define, and execute new growth-accelerating opportunities. He also shares ideas on LinkedIn (robertgbarker), in guest posts on related blogs, and in industry publications. Contact him via email at bob@2020outlook.com.

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